PowerPoint versus posters

26 05 2011

At The Art of Presentation event recently, I met Jac Cattaneo from Northbrook College Sussex, an affiliated college of the University of Brighton. She worked on a Visual Practices Project for LearnHigher that looked at the use of individually-designed posters instead of PowerPoint as a visual aid in assessed student presentations.

More information about the project is available here:
http://www.brighton.ac.uk/visuallearning/project-news/cattaneo/

The above Web page also includes links to the Full Project Report as well as a PDF guide to using posters to support research presentations. Having looked at the guide I am inspired to use it in combination with the technology possibilities of Prezi.

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Cropping images in Prezi

26 05 2011

Yesterday Prezi sent out an email about more new features: finally you can crop images from within Prezi!! This shows a shift towards enabling users to do more image editing without leaving Prezi and it will be interesting to see how far they take this. I wonder if there will be more image editing features within Prezi in future?

Additionally they have made it possible to create ‘bendy’ lines and arrows. View the movie clip here: http://blog.prezi.com/2011/05/05/better-lines-and-arrows-image-cropping/





The Art of Presentation: teaching with images

26 05 2011

The Art of Presentation: teaching with images was held at HEFCE, Centre Point, London on Tuesday 10th May. This workshop, aimed primarily at teaching staff, investigated digital presentation tools within arts education. Attendees were drawn from the Kensington and Chelsea College of Further Education, Middlesex University, Northbrook College Sussex, Southampton Solent University, University for the Creative Arts (four Colleges were represented), University of Brighton, University of the Arts London, and the University of Warwick.

In addition to two hands-on workshops (one involving laptops and the other involving knitting yarn and Blu-TackĀ®) presentations were given using Prezi, PowerPoint, using a handling collection, and by flip chart.

The plenary session was chaired by Hilaire Graham, Dean of Learning and
Teaching, University for the Creative Arts; key points raised were:

  • As well as teaching/presenting with surrogate images it is important to look at the real thing through student field trips to museums and galleries and so on. The tactile elements of handling images can also be useful.
  • It is important that as teachers/presenters we own the content we are presenting/teaching about.
  • Images have an important role to play in encouraging students to engage with their subject, to encourage a dialogue or discussion, and to foster visual literacy and the skills of doing, practising, and making.
  • We need to apply our criticality in choosing the appropriate presentation tool for the situation.
  • The importance of not relying on technology i.e. having multiple back-ups, on a memory stick, a disc, even acetate depending on the venue! Otherwise using a flip chart and ultimately relying on yourself.
  • Some of the items that participants were going to follow-up on were:
    • Exploring Prezi
    • Exploring dipity to use for giving advice during student inductions
    • Checking out TED
    • Checking out VUE and the Khan Academy
    • Looking at the art historical technique of ‘compare and contrast’
    • Finding out how to build a wiki
  • As a group we discussed some of the benefits and drawbacks of different presentation tools, Hilaire suggested writing a brief, like a wishlist for our ideal presentation tool for teaching with images. Marie-Therese welcomed feedback on this.

Notes
This event was made possible through a University for the Creative Arts Learning and Teaching Research Fund grant; more details of the research is available here: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt/
Download programme for ‘The Art of Presentation’ workshop.





Identifying impact with SlideShare

6 05 2011

Brian Kelly, UK Web Focus (job title), at UKOLN has written a post about using SlideShare stats to identify impact. This was for the JISC-funded PoWR project looking at the preservation of Web resources. PoWR project resources had been embedded and favourited, and had view stats in SlideShare; some of the comments included useful anecdotal evidence on impact.

Links: