Embedding a Prezi into a WordPress.com blog

8 02 2013

This has just taken me a while to fix myself so I thought I may be able to save others time if I share the following.

As can be seen from older blog posts on this site I had no problems embedding a Prezi before. However in December 2012 Prezi.com changed their embed code.

After searching for a fix I found the following blog post by Panos:

The update at the bottom of the blog post is great – it simply tells you where Prezi have moved the ID to since December. This works fine in most Web browsers however in some Internet Explorer browsers (my work computer has a particularly old version of IE) you get annoying scrollbars at the right and bottom of the Prezi. Eventually after searching I found the fix was to add style=”position:absolute”:

So the completed code required to make it work now looks like this:

code-to-embed-prezi-in-wordpress

[A larger more readable image is available from clicking on the image file above. Originally this blog post included the text but with changes to formatting it has been necessary to replace with an image as I will no longer be able to keep updating this post.]

The Prezi ID mewlfkbikpeq can be found at the beginning of the link to the Prezi itself: http://prezi.com/mewlfkbikpeq/introduction-to-ar/

The effect is like:

Also something I do incase the Prezi doesn’t display on a particular device is to add the following:

The Prezi can also be accessed here: http://prezi.com/mewlfkbikpeq/introduction-to-ar/

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CCC at the V & A

4 02 2012

Our Create Curate Collaborate! project continued apace with the first trip to the V&A with the students on Wednesday, facilitated by Leanne Manfredi of the V&A. A day’s exploration into Creative Writing at the V&A, designed and presented by Jac Cattaneo and Curtis Tappenden, was the primary focus for the 21 students, from Northbrook College and University for the Creative Arts.

As part of the programme for the day I was invited to do a session on Prezi. This was in four parts, and I share it here in case it is useful for anyone else to use/re-use/adapt/amend. Feedback is definitely welcomed!

Part 1. Verbal introduction
I introduced myself and explained what we were going to do and how long it would take (45 minutes). To enable us to evaluate the project the students were also asked to complete brief paper (1 side of A4) questionnaires. This had already been mentioned as part of the project consent forms they signed before undertaking the trip. Chocolate as an afternoon ‘sweetener’ too!

Part 2. An analogue introduction to the concept of Prezi

You will need (per two students): one sheet of A3 plain paper, three different colour felt-tip pens, a block of post-it notes, some printed out images from the V&A Collections website

The explanation: the sheet of paper represents the Prezi canvas; online this is almost infinite (the paper is limited as one student wrote down); the post-it notes represent the text boxes that you can have in Prezi (click anywhere to add a piece of text then move this around like a post-it note); the images from the V&A were designed to show how Prezi could be used following our visit to the V&A; the felt-tip pens were for writing on the post-it notes (although the students naturally drew arrows as well which demonstrates another Prezi feature too!).

The brief: students were asked to work in pairs with the materials, the object was to define relationships and links between the images (V&A museum objects) based on their own feelings and expressed with phrases of creative writing on the post-it notes. One student was happy to talk about her analogue Prezi to the others and communicated her ideas really clearly to the rest of the group.

Part 3. YouTube demo

I let the following screencast (which I had prepared earlier) play, and described verbally what was happening.

Part 4. Demo of example Prezi

The students were shown the ‘interactive poster’ Prezi that we had created for the University of Brighton Pedagogy conference. They particularly liked the zoom into the Moon Stone jar on the V&A map. This then led into any questions. I gave a one-side-of-A4 handout for their reference: download Prezi handout (PDF).

Follow-up

Jac and Curtis will now support the students getting signed up with Prezi EDU Enjoy user accounts (a few are already signed up), and then I will visit each group of students for another Prezi session.





Prezi Triple Whammy at UCA!

30 01 2012

The Create Curate Collaborate! project team were delighted to have an abstract accepted for the University for the Creative Arts Learning and Teaching conference, held at the British Library on Wednesday 25th January 2012. This conference is always really inspiring and a great opportunity to catch up with colleagues across the University; this year’s opening keynote was even given in Prezi!

Our session titled ‘Considering blended communication- creative thinking, writing and image making- through initial explorations of Prezi non-linear, digital presentation tools.’ comprised of three very different Prezis:

The audience arrived to the sounds of ‘Walk the Line’ on vinyl, and white grapes; Curtis Tappenden, artist, author and poet, presented a ‘Prezi Poem’ titled ‘Prezi Hesi Tate’:

I provided some background to our project and how the use of Prezi has changed my thinking from a linear example using a screencast of PowerPoint slides, to the Prezi non-linear; ‘Create Curate Collaborate!’:

Two of the students from Curtis’ Creative Writing Group at Rochester: Annabel Giraud-Telme and Benjamin Viney gave an outstanding presentation on their own personal experience of using Prezi; ‘We walk the line’:

I have learnt so much from my colleagues Jac and Curtis, and also from the students. Unfortunately Jac Cattaneo wasn’t able to attend but her contribution was very much evident in terms of the paper we co-wrote together in Google Docs, and also particularly in the cross-over between Curtis and Jac’s creative writing groups.

Next step, an interactive poster Prezi for University of Brighton!





When PowerPoint is good

14 01 2012

To be honest, I am starting to get nostalgic for PowerPoint. I subscribe to the school of thought that it is the presenter not the tool that makes it a good presentation. Although I don’t discount the role some tools play in creating the presentation e.g. mindmapping and Prezi allowing certain patterns of thinking, whereas PowerPoint is a linear mode of thinking (more on this to follow). I also still agree with an earlier blog post that it is ‘horses for courses‘.

In researching about Prezi, I have mentioned thewikiman already (blog post, November 2011), however I haven’t mentioned that I am a fan of his PowerPoint presentations, available via SlideShare. My favourite two are below:

Stop Breaking the Basic Rules of Presenting

How to use Prezi and win: thewikiman’s 10 top tips to make a good one

The only problem with doing learning resources on Prezi is that it updates so frequently that things get out of date really quickly. Or to look at it positively, Prezi is always improving and responding to user feedback. I have been working on a short guide for the Create Curate Collaborate! project but keep hesitating about when to complete it as it could be out-of-date quite quickly, or I could just re-issue new versions as Prezi do with their learning materials (see blog post with Prezi learning links).





Google Docs presentations reconsidered

6 01 2012

When I first started researching presentation tools, one of the first I looked at was Google Docs presentations. Despite one impressive animation created using the tool (Google Demo Slam: Epic Docs Animation), I discounted it as it seemed to have less functionality than PowerPoint and was also a linear tool i.e. it didn’t really have anything special to offer IMO.

Google presentations upgraded in October (see blog posts under ‘Links’), and now has more features, including:

  • Transitions to move between slides with simple fades or spicier 3D effects
  • Animations to add emphasis or to make your slides more playful
  • New themes to create beautiful presentations with distinct visual styles
  • Drawings to build new designs, layouts, and flowcharts within a presentation
  • Rich tables with merged cells and more options for adding style to your data

(Ref: ‘A fresh start for Google presentations‘)

What is interesting about these features is that they are apparently some of the most requested by users. Questions:

  • Who are these users? what kind of demographic/background? how do they use Google Docs?
  • Why did they choose these features? To make Google presentations more like PowerPoint? Delibrately or subconsciously?
  • How did Google Docs select the ‘most wanted’ features?

The improved collaborative feature is what interests me the most; now character-by-character collaboration is possible, akin to that previously offered in Google Docs documents. Not only does this bring presentations up to the standard of the other Google Docs, but it also poses a challenge to Prezi as it could be argued that Google Docs is more powerful for collaboration than Prezi. I will be watching the development of Google Docs presentations and Prezi with interest.

Links





Scouting for learning spaces at the V&A

6 01 2012

Curtis, Jac, and I (with my son in tow) met at the V&A during our Christmas holidays to explore the V&A learning spaces that had been recommended by Leanne and also scouted out by Jac on her previous visit. The learning spaces were chosen in order to inspire creativity and also for practical reasons to ensure we could use them with a group of students.

This Prezi was a collaborative effort with my son: ‘V&A visit‘. The reasons for creating this were:

  • explore the idea suggested by Jac about using Prezi to create a ‘journey of a visit’
  • explore the idea suggested by Curtis about engaging my son with Prezi (why not!)
  • potentially produce a template that could be used by the students if they would like to use it
  • record our visit in order to document our project work and support the visit with the students in early February




Minute Madness

14 12 2011

This post is about lessons learned from my first experience of ‘minute madness’ – a one minute presentation given in a group of about 30 people last week at the International Digital Curation Conference (IDCC).

Lessons Learned

  • 60 seconds is a surprisingly long time – next time I would think of it in terms of 3 x 20 seconds (i.e. 3 pecha kucha slides)
  • the best PowerPoint slides were simple –  even though people normally read PowerPoint slides whilst presenters are talking, the 1-minute focuses much more on the presenter and much less on the slide
  • include an image and key contact detail e.g. URL or email address on the slide
  • trying to get your point across in 1 minute means the focus is not on the information but rather on: 1. a hook OR something crazy to grab attention and be memorable – the stranger the better; 2. remembering to give your contact details