Pecha Kucha presentation tips

7 09 2011

I gave my first Pecha Kucha presentation as part of a session at the REPOfringe 2011, University of Edinburgh. Some thoughts/notes below:

  • Pronouncing Pecha Kucha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdghID66kLs
  • Creating a Pecha Kucha in PowerPoint 2007 i.e. 20 images each on the screen for 20 seconds: choose 20 images and store in a folder; open PPt 2007 and select ‘Insert’ then select ‘Photo Album’ and ‘New Photo Album’; in the dialogue box select Insert picture from ‘File/Disk…’ and browse to your folder of images; select all 20 images and choose ‘Insert’; from the drop-down list for Picture Layout choose ‘1 picture’ then select ‘Create’; delete the auto-generated title slide; in the Slide Sorter view select all 20 slides then choose ‘Animations’ and at the end of the ribbon under ‘Advance Slide’ tick the check box for ‘Automatically After’ and add ’00:20′ which will provide a total of 6 minutes and 40 seconds.
  • The winner of the REPOfringe Pecha Kucha Session (day 1) was Shelia Fraser (EDINA) on ‘Using OpenURL Activity Data’

    http://rfringe11.blogs.edina.ac.uk/2011/08/03/liveblog-pecha-kucha-session-1/
    And the video of Shelia’s talk is available via YouTube.

  • .

  • Using Prezi for Pecha Kucha: select ‘show mode’ press and hold the right arrow in the navigation bar and you will see an option layer sliding out, select autoplay every 20 seconds

    (Reference – http://blog.prezi.com/2010/01/28/prezis-in-davos-tim-berners-lee/)

  • Exemplar Pecha Kucha presentation using Prezi: my vote for the REPOfringe Pecha Kucha Session (day 2) was Robbie Ireland and Toby Hanning (Enlighten, Glasgow University) – Glasgow Mini-REF exercise available here: http://prezi.com/peualtehcmhq/you-are-the-mini-ref/
    and see also: http://rfringe11.blogs.edina.ac.uk/2011/08/04/liveblog-pecha-kucha-session-2/
  • The most engaging Pecha Kucha presentations used full screen images rather than bullet-pointed slides, although diagrams were interesting there wasn’t really time to explain them.
  • I spent at least as long, if not longer, preparing my Pecha Kucha 6 minute and 40 second presentation then I would preparing a ‘normal’ presentation, but still I think it would have benefited from even more run-throughs to make it more seamless i.e. to avoid the ‘gaps’.




PowerPoint and learning spaces

26 07 2011

PowerPoint and Learning Spaces:

“Ubiquitous devices operate as machines for tuning the environment. Drawings, specifications, computer models, spreadsheets, lists of milestones, PowerPoint presentations, and emails likewise are tuning devices, as are the documents that purport to bring them all together.”

Coyne, R. 2010. Tuning of Place: Sociable Spaces and Pervasive Digital Media. Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press. p 8.

Comments from History of Art students on PowerPoint:

“‘I get the feeling that technology is being used for the sake of it… they’ve bought all this technology and they have to use it… I don’t like the feeling of technology being forced upon us’

[without pre-prepared PowerPoints] ‘discussions kind of evolve’ and become more freeflowing: ‘you’re never quite sure where it’s going to go and where you’re going to end up… it does feel a lot freer’

PowerPoint can deliver too much information too fast: ‘I felt like I was being shot with information. It was coming at you so hard and fast.’”

Melhuish, C. (2010) Ethnographic case study: perceptions of three new learning spaces and their impact on the learning and teaching process at the Universities of Sussex and Brighton. Commissioned by CETLC, Universities of Sussex and Brighton, and CETLD, School of Arts and Architecture, University of Brighton. p.46. Available from: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/18488/LS-Case-Study-3.pdf





eLearning Forum Symposium – ‘Beyond Powerpoint’

30 06 2011

University of Dundee’s Library and Learning Centre (LLC) are holding an event today titled ‘Beyond PowerPoint’. It looks like a great programme: http://www.dundee.ac.uk/library/teachingexcellence/supportingcpd/elfsymposium.htm





PowerPoint versus posters

26 05 2011

At The Art of Presentation event recently, I met Jac Cattaneo from Northbrook College Sussex, an affiliated college of the University of Brighton. She worked on a Visual Practices Project for LearnHigher that looked at the use of individually-designed posters instead of PowerPoint as a visual aid in assessed student presentations.

More information about the project is available here:
http://www.brighton.ac.uk/visuallearning/project-news/cattaneo/

The above Web page also includes links to the Full Project Report as well as a PDF guide to using posters to support research presentations. Having looked at the guide I am inspired to use it in combination with the technology possibilities of Prezi.





From the audience’s perspective

22 03 2011

Some personal thoughts about a recently attended event, which shall remain anonymous in order to make candid reflections (not revelations though as I expect most people have had similar experiences/thoughts):

  • The room environment can impinge on the learning experience. We were warned about the erratic temperature control before the beginning of the event; it didn’t bother me but noticeably bothered others including one attendee who donned a knitted hat!
  • A total blackout can make a more immersive learning experience. In the case of one presentation the total blackout was very effective, creating an almost cinematic experience due to the speaker’s clever use of PowerPoint (building a visual narrative) and excellent oral delivery.
  • A total blackout can be really physically uncomfortable and disconcerting. It must have been a good number of years since I last experienced a lecture theatre in such darkness; when the lights came on for questions at the end of each presentation everyone was virtually blinded by the light. It was also impossible to take notes during most of the presentations, apart from those presentations which included slides with white backgrounds when there was just enough light to see.
  • I reflected on the presentations given at the event thinking about how I could improve both the PowerPoint presentations I have given as well as improve my presentation skills generally. From conversations with others at the event I think this largely comes down to: good visuals; clever use of terminology; clarity of thought and expression; and above all practice!!




Prezi – more thoughts, pros and cons

12 01 2011

I was trying to embrace Prezi for a presentation I was giving yesterday, and it started quite well, I enjoyed arranging the content and it was giving me a new perspective i.e. I was conscious of how linear my thought process was and so I was trying to change this. But in the end this process was scuppered by lack of Internet connection (over several days). I realise you can pay to use Prezi offline, but I don’t want to pay for this service! In the end I reverted to a linear PowerPoint. Now I appreciate being online so much more!

A new Prezi pro point: there is now an iPad app for Prezi!





One word to describe PowerPoint

3 12 2010

At both recent presentations I asked participants to write ‘one word to describe PowerPoint’ on a small slip of paper. These were then collected and some of them read out during the presentations. See all the responses combined into a tag cloud:

image of a tag cloud of words to describe PowerPoint

Screenshot of tag cloud generated by http://tagcrowd.com/

As shown in the image above, the two most frequent words were linear and useful, and the others listed were: abused, ambivalent, a tool, backwards, basic, blackboard, bland, broken video, bullet-y, confining, easy, flat, functional, hell, helpful, inflexible, limiting, Microsoft, overused, powerful, predictable, presentation, proprietary, restrictive, rigid, sterile, sucks, tedious, uncreative, undercooked, visual